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Connective Tissue Shoulder (Left)

L Conoid Ligament

The conoid ligament is the posterior and medial fasciculus of the coracoclavicular ligament. It is formed by a dense band of fibers, conical in form, with its base directed upward;

 

L Subdeltoid Bursa

This is a condition caused by inflammation of the bursa that separates the superior surface of the supraspinatus tendon (one of the four tendons of the rotator cuff) from the overlying coraco-acromial ligament, acromion, coracoid (the acromial arch) and from the deep surface of the deltoid muscle;

 

L Coracoclavicular Bursa

A bursa frequently present between the tendon of the coracobrachialis and the subscapularis muscles;

 

L Infraspinatus Bursa

Related to infraspinatus bursa: supraspinatus, rotator cuff muscles, Coracobrachialis;

 

L Acromioclavicular Ligament

This ligament is a quadrilateral band, covering the superior part of the articulation, and extending between the upper part of the lateral end of the clavicle and the adjoining part of the upper surface of the acromion;

 

L Coracohumeral Ligament

This is a broad ligament which strengthens the upper part of the capsule of the shoulder joint;

 

L Trapezoid Ligament

The trapezoid ligament, the anterior and lateral fasciculus, is broad, thin, and quadrilateral: it is placed obliquely between the coracoid process and the clavicle. It is attached, below, to the upper surface of the coracoid process; above, to the oblique ridge on the under surface of the clavicle;

 

L Superior Transverse Ligament

The trapezoid ligament, the anterior and lateral fasciculus, is broad, thin, and quadrilateral: it is placed obliquely between the coracoid process and the clavicle. It is attached, below, to the upper surface of the coracoid process; above, to the oblique ridge on the under surface of the clavicle;

 

L Capsular Ligament

The capsular ligament of the shoulder is surrounded and reinforced by muscles, tendons, and ligaments, which are largely responsible for keeping the adjoining parts together. A capsule is a membrane or sac enclosing a body part, usually a joint;

 

L Subscapular Bursa

Bursa between the tendon of the subcaspularis muscle and the neck of the scapula, it communicates with the shoulder joint;

 

L Transverse Humeral Ligament

This forms a broad band bridging the lesser and greater tubercle of the humerus. Its attachments are limited superior to the epiphysial line. By enclosing the canal of the bicipital groove (intertubercular groove), it functions to hold the long head of the biceps tendon within the bicipital groove;

 

L Supra Acromion Bursa

This is located on the superior aspect of the acromion and normally does not communicate with the glenohumeral joint. Supra-acromial bursitis has not been receiving much attention from literature and remains described mainly as case reports of presumptive diagnosis with no histopathological correlation. Since the bursa is supra-acromial, not supraclavicular, fluid-filled masses located over the acromioclavicular joint or distal clavicle do not correspond to supra-acromial bursitis;

 

L Inferior Coracoid Bursa

It is located anterior to the subscapularis muscle and inferior to the coracoid process. Its function is to reduce friction between the coracobrachialis, subscapularis and short head of the biceps tendons, thus facilitating internal and external rotation of the shoulder;

 

L Intertubercular Tendon Sheath

The extension of the synovial membrane of the shoulder joint donward in the intertubercular grove to surround thetendon of the long head of the biceps;

 

L Glenoid Labrum

The glenoid labrum is a fibrocartilaginous structure  rim attached around the margin of the glenoid cavity in the shoulder blade. The shoulder joint is considered a ball and socket joint.The socket is deepened by the glenoid labrum;

 

L Superior Glenohumeral Ligament

In human anatomy, the glenohumeral ligaments (GHL) are three ligaments on the anterior side of the glenohumeral joint (i.e. between the glenoid cavity of the scapula and the head of the humerus; colloquially called the shoulder joint). Reinforcing the anterior glenohumeral joint capsule, the superior, middle, and inferior glenohumeral ligaments play different roles in the stability of the head of the humerus depending on arm position and degree of rotation;

 

L Middle Glenohumeral Ligament

In human anatomy, the glenohumeral ligaments (GHL) are three ligaments on the anterior side of the glenohumeral joint (i.e. between the glenoid cavity of the scapula and the head of the humerus; colloquially called the shoulder joint). Reinforcing the anterior glenohumeral joint capsule, the superior, middle, and inferior glenohumeral ligaments play different roles in the stability of the head of the humerus depending on arm position and degree of rotation;

 

L Inferior Glenohumeral Ligament

In human anatomy, the glenohumeral ligaments (GHL) are three ligaments on the anterior side of the glenohumeral joint (i.e. between the glenoid cavity of the scapula and the head of the humerus; colloquially called the shoulder joint). Reinforcing the anterior glenohumeral joint capsule, the superior, middle, and inferior glenohumeral ligaments play different roles in the stability of the head of the humerus depending on arm position and degree of rotation;